Calculated Risk

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About Me

When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it.

Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor

SMART KIDS WHO SMOKE WEED.....
HONOR ROLL


0 °R The Absolute Zero



While trying not to look down...I'm making my dreams come true and calculating the risks all the time now.

Blogs I follow:

Theme by: Miguel
  1. fastcompany:

The days of control and conformity are over, and it’s within our power to bring today’s workplace up to speed. All it takes is some guts.
A young man dives from a 30-foot cliff over a waterfall inside Casa Bonita, a Mexican-themed “entertainment” restaurant in Denver, Colo. That’s his job; he dives again and again for the enjoyment of dining patrons. Between dives he admits, “I have yet to have a day where I don’t want to go to work.”
Most people aren’t that lucky or brave. We don’t often get to practice our craft again and again, let alone get cheered on to dive in or climb back up. Doing it every day doesn’t mean it doesn’t require courage, that it’s not hard, or that there aren’t risks; there are just more reasons to keep doing it in spite of the what-ifs.
Leadership, in large part, requires jumping in head first, lapping back and forth, occasionally leading a pack, but often leaping alone, usually in a race against the next guy. But for all the talk of collaboration and big ideas, new business practices, and social reach, most work hasn’t changed much.
Fundamental people practices in modern companies were forged in an era when control and conformity were thought useful. Today, we know they stifle creativity and customer focus at a time when companies fail on less.
As we seek options for ourselves, we don’t always think to remind people there are collective options to elevate us as a species. As Diana Korte, a women’s health advocate, once wrote, “If you don’t know your options, you don’t have any.”
Our digital world accelerates change and gives us an opportunity to be more of who we are. With almost unlimited access to information, we also have a greater understanding that the world needs our help. We expect twists and turns in our journey, but where we are today shouldn’t suck.
It’s time for work to change. Here are four ways leaders can push work forward.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    The days of control and conformity are over, and it’s within our power to bring today’s workplace up to speed. All it takes is some guts.

    A young man dives from a 30-foot cliff over a waterfall inside Casa Bonita, a Mexican-themed “entertainment” restaurant in Denver, Colo. That’s his job; he dives again and again for the enjoyment of dining patrons. Between dives he admits, “I have yet to have a day where I don’t want to go to work.”

    Most people aren’t that lucky or brave. We don’t often get to practice our craft again and again, let alone get cheered on to dive in or climb back up. Doing it every day doesn’t mean it doesn’t require courage, that it’s not hard, or that there aren’t risks; there are just more reasons to keep doing it in spite of the what-ifs.

    Leadership, in large part, requires jumping in head first, lapping back and forth, occasionally leading a pack, but often leaping alone, usually in a race against the next guy. But for all the talk of collaboration and big ideas, new business practices, and social reach, most work hasn’t changed much.

    Fundamental people practices in modern companies were forged in an era when control and conformity were thought useful. Today, we know they stifle creativity and customer focus at a time when companies fail on less.

    As we seek options for ourselves, we don’t always think to remind people there are collective options to elevate us as a species. As Diana Korte, a women’s health advocate, once wrote, “If you don’t know your options, you don’t have any.”

    Our digital world accelerates change and gives us an opportunity to be more of who we are. With almost unlimited access to information, we also have a greater understanding that the world needs our help. We expect twists and turns in our journey, but where we are today shouldn’t suck.

    It’s time for work to change. Here are four ways leaders can push work forward.

    Read More>

  2. 36 Notes
    Reblogged: fastcompany
  3. mariella-angela:

Kendrick | Oil on Canvas | 24x30

    mariella-angela:

    Kendrick | Oil on Canvas | 24x30

    (Source: mariellaangela.com)

  4. 980 Notes
    Reblogged: hiphoplaboratory
  5. "I think I’m allergic to people who are unwilling to broaden their perspectives."

    - Dau Voire (via kushandwizdom)

     

    (via oliveweed)
  6. 7183 Notes
    Reblogged: ksvbi
  7. beyoncefashionstyle:

best pic ever

    beyoncefashionstyle:

    best pic ever

  8. 10385 Notes
    Reblogged: hiphoplaboratory
  9. wellisnthatnice:

W108 + Hasselblad on Flickr.
  10. 13862 Notes
    Reblogged: admeister
  11. fabforgottennobility:

the One

    fabforgottennobility:

    the One

    (Source: airows)

  12. 262 Notes
  13. wnderlst:

Monsanto, Portugal | Nessa G.

    wnderlst:

    Monsanto, Portugal | Nessa G.
  14. 2249 Notes
    Reblogged: g0atman
  15. (Source: northgang)

  16. 35888 Notes
    Reblogged: hiphoplaboratory
  17. Idk why I find this absolutely hilarious lol (at Rock N Roll Hall Of Fame)

    Idk why I find this absolutely hilarious lol (at Rock N Roll Hall Of Fame)

  18. (Source: dreambonfire)

  19. 55 Notes
  20. sexlane:


mrcheyl:

I watched this for about a minute and a half before hitting the post button. 

.

    sexlane:

    mrcheyl:

    I watched this for about a minute and a half before hitting the post button. 

    .

  21. 65906 Notes
    Reblogged: kushandjcrew
  22. 21947 Notes
    Reblogged: aeropostale
  23. (Source: nichvlas)

  24. 496972 Notes
    Reblogged: g0atman
  25. aquariusplanet:

likes this ♥

    aquariusplanet:

    likes this ♥

    (Source: painting-a-picture)

  26. 276 Notes
  27. fastcompany:

A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.
The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.
The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.
The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.

    The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.

    The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

    image

    Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.

    The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:

    Read More>

  28. 306 Notes
    Reblogged: fastcompany